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Jawn...it's for the internet

Hi,

An avid reader and in a lot of fandoms, would lists them, but we would be here a while.

Love bees, synths, ukuleles, cheekbones and pretending to travel through the cracks between space and time among other things.

Custard makes me slightly weak at the knees, Tom Hiddleson and Emma Watson strangely enough have the same effect on me.

In a constant epic battle with spelling, apparently in the word "split", the 'l' goes before the 'i', I know, crazy right?!

I thought I escaped the dark hole that is tumblr, but once you sign up you can never truly leave :0 Well, going to finish writing before this goes south, so long and thanks for all the fish ;)

whenithink of marmite.tumbr.com

Reblog if one of your favorite characters has ever died.

Oct 19th at 8PM / via: trust / op: bellamybake / 268,892 notes

trashclown420:

image

Rest in peace, Mongo from Shrek 2. Your life was fleeting but you will never be forgotten.


Oct 19th at 8PM / via: eeeelieh / op: eeeelieh / 5 notes

eeeelieh:

eeeelieh:

I just stumbled upon 4000 words of a Viclock fic I have no collection of ever writing.

Oh dear lord, April me had sense of humour and poor grasp of grammar. 


Oct 19th at 7PM / via: mattyisbored / op: huffingtonpost / 371,542 notes

nowyoukno:

huffingtonpost:

This Man With Severe Cerebral Palsy Created Mind-Blowing Art Using Just A Typewriter

Last year, 22-time Emmy award-winning reporter John Stofflet posted this news video he created for KING-TV in 2004, featuring Paul Smith and his artistic talents.

See the full video to see more of Smith’s artworks and to learn more about his inspiring story go here. 

please spread this man’s refreshing and inspirational story


Oct 19th at 6PM / via: mattyisbored / op: laughing420 / 434,458 notes

Oct 19th at 6PM / via: probablyalannister / op: amaratai / 650,633 notes

vintage-katie:

wakethosewhoslumber:

blua:

this is why she is the queen of genovia

this is why she is the queen of genovia

the fucking queen of genovia. 


Oct 19th at 6PM / via: dajo42 / op: inhislight / 26,182 notes

Frozen characters in Once Upon A Time 


Oct 19th at 6PM / via: curryofdeath / op: pillory / 28,809 notes
eatyourlesbians:

blogslut:

this is the most unfortunate typo

yes…typo 

eatyourlesbians:

blogslut:

this is the most unfortunate typo

yes…typo 


Oct 19th at 5PM / via: probablyalannister / op: niknak79 / 284,578 notes
cleverpudding:

niknak79:

Kids playing with a water hose during coast guard demonstration.

the longer I look at this the harder I laugh

cleverpudding:

niknak79:

Kids playing with a water hose during coast guard demonstration.

the longer I look at this the harder I laugh


Oct 19th at 5PM / via: eeeelieh / op: katiebishop / 364,978 notes

dangerhamster:

100,000 notes and I wonder how many people realise this line was improvised by a 7 year old

For those that don’t know, this is a show called Outnumbered. A British show where the child actors are only given guidelines not actual lines so they say whatever feels natural for them to say in the scene. I think only the oldest brother has actual lines. If I remember correctly this girl was the youngest person in the country to ever win a comedy award.


When someone accuses your jam of being too thin

Oct 19th at 5PM / via: latitudeoctopus / op: bbcone / 1,395 notes

bbcone:

image


fangirling-about-theavengers:

waiting for the age of ultron trailer like

imageimage

image



Oct 19th at 4PM / via: ask-koki-kariya / op: g-odd-ess / 40,827 notes

ask-koki-kariya:

staff:

g-odd-ess:

Dream Job: being part of tumblr staff and just commenting sassy gifs on people’s text posts all day.

image

what even is tumblr staff?


selfcareafterrape:

[Image Description: Getting Over Triggers: An Incomplete Guide]
Disclaimer:
Not all triggers can be gotten over and even if a trigger can be gotten over, doesn’t particularly mean it should. It is entirely up to the survivor to choose which triggers to try and get over, and whether or not they want to get over them at all.
Sometimes when people get over a trigger- they will still be sensitive to it in the case of relapse or more stress. 
First Step: Identifying Triggers
Triggers kind of fall in two areas. We have our super general triggers that can often be identified by a quick HALT check. (The halt system suggests that when stressed we ask ourselves ‘Am I a. Hungry b. Angry c. Lonely or d. Tired?’ ) These are things that aren’t necessarily ‘PTSD’ triggers- so much as they lower our threshold in general. You want to still be aware of these for that very reason. 
Then we have our more specific PTSD/trauma triggers.
It can be a feeling. For instance- survivors of childhood trauma often struggle with anything that makes them feel small.
It can be a visual thing. Whether it be something your attacker wore, something that you watched a lot during your trauma period, people that look kind of like the assailant. 
It can be an auditory thing. A sound, a name. 
It can be a smell. Smells are actually extremely strong triggers usually.
It can be a touch.
Triggers are things that cause an uptick in symptoms. Whether they cause panic attacks, flashbacks, or a return to behaviors such as self harm or disordered eating.
Step Two: Learning how to Self-Soothe/Ground
Self Soothing/Grounding behaviors are a dime a dozen, it’s all a matter of finding a good handful that work for you.
It’s extremely important that you find a system that works for you before trying to handle a trigger. 
There isn’t enough room on a post to go over every possible self-soothing/grounding behavior but I’m going to list some. Do some exploration on your own to find something that works or you.
1. Get an ‘oh shit’ box, or a grounding bag, or whatever you want to call it. A place where you physically keep  things that help you. Kind notes from friends. A color book. Play Dough. You’ll want things that cover all the sensory experiences.
2. Proper breathing exercises. These don’t work for everyone- but they do have a higher success rate when done correctly. 
3. Cold oranges. Oranges kept in the fridge and then peeled help a lot of people ‘come down’ from triggered states. It’s a sensory thing- both touch and focus and smell.
4. Keeping a grounding object. Whether it be a spinner ring, a necklace, a rock you keep in your pocket. Something you touch often and use as a ‘I am here and this is now’
5. Essential oils can really help.
6. Journaling or Art.
7. Going back to a safe place. Whether this be a physical place or a ‘place’ in your mind.
8. Counting down from 100 by 7’s. Or other things like that require you to focus.
9. Having a playlist specifically for these times. I find that having them set from sort of… high energy.angry. music to slowly going down to more calm helps me personally.
10. Progressive Muscle Relaxation.
But really, self soothing/grounding things… there are hundreds upon hundreds of options.  It’s just a matter of looking around and finding what works for you. You’ll want to find multiple. These are not cure alls by themselves- they are skills to layer upon one another.
Step Three: Define Your Triggers
In step one- you identified your triggers, now I want you to better define them. 
For instance- if touch sets you off- is it all touch? or is touch to a certain area of your body? or by people you don’t know? or when you don’ t have forewarning
This will help you understand where to start.
Step Four: Create an Action Plan and act on it.
Now you’re going to use all the information from steps three and two, as well as figuring out what skills and people you have in your life that would be willing to help.
Know what coping skills/self soothing/grounding things you will turn to.
Figure out how you’re going to start. Start small. For instance- if you have a touch trigger then you might want to start by making sure you’re as completely relaxed and in as safe an environment as possible- and then having someone you trust touch you.
Remind yourself that you are safe, that you know who is doing it, and that you’re going to be okay. Once again- start out small. Only do it for a few minutes at first- if that.
If a place is triggering, having a friend come with you and working yourself up to staying longer times. Knowing that this time? You can leave as soon as you need to. You are in control. Notice how you feel- notice the racing heart or the nausea or whatever it is- don’t shame yourself for feeling this way. Just know that it won’t be forever.
You’re going to want to make new associations as well. In over simplified terms- a trigger is basically when we see/feel/hear/whatever A and the synaptic connection immediately jumps to the trauma. What you want to do is make new synaptic connections so that it is no longer the first place you unconsciously jump to- and strengthen them regularly.  
You’re going to want to slowly work yourself up to handling more and more. It is a slow process, and it often involves a lot of agitation. Don’t push yourself too hard too fast. It’s better to spend awhile working on five minutes at a time until five minutes doesn’t bother you- than to jump in and push yourself into a relapse.
Step Five: Self Care and Processing.
Make sure that you self-soothe before and after you do things and to spend time processing what happened and how it makes you feel. When you start to tackle triggers things will usually come up. It will probably help to keep a journal regarding this process. Talk about how it makes you feel, whether physically or emotionally. Talk about what seems to work and what seems to not. You may notice patterns this way too. 
Don’t beat yourself up for not doing perfectly or still getting upset. Instead celebrate the successes and that you are now in control. You can end the trigger sensation when you want to. You can self soothe now. You have the power.
There will a guide regarding ways to handle names specifically sometime in the future. 

selfcareafterrape:

[Image Description: Getting Over Triggers: An Incomplete Guide]

Disclaimer:

Not all triggers can be gotten over and even if a trigger can be gotten over, doesn’t particularly mean it should. It is entirely up to the survivor to choose which triggers to try and get over, and whether or not they want to get over them at all.

Sometimes when people get over a trigger- they will still be sensitive to it in the case of relapse or more stress. 

First Step: Identifying Triggers

Triggers kind of fall in two areas. We have our super general triggers that can often be identified by a quick HALT check. (The halt system suggests that when stressed we ask ourselves ‘Am I a. Hungry b. Angry c. Lonely or d. Tired?’ ) These are things that aren’t necessarily ‘PTSD’ triggers- so much as they lower our threshold in general. You want to still be aware of these for that very reason. 

Then we have our more specific PTSD/trauma triggers.

It can be a feeling. For instance- survivors of childhood trauma often struggle with anything that makes them feel small.

It can be a visual thing. Whether it be something your attacker wore, something that you watched a lot during your trauma period, people that look kind of like the assailant. 

It can be an auditory thing. A sound, a name. 

It can be a smell. Smells are actually extremely strong triggers usually.

It can be a touch.

Triggers are things that cause an uptick in symptoms. Whether they cause panic attacks, flashbacks, or a return to behaviors such as self harm or disordered eating.

Step Two: Learning how to Self-Soothe/Ground

Self Soothing/Grounding behaviors are a dime a dozen, it’s all a matter of finding a good handful that work for you.

It’s extremely important that you find a system that works for you before trying to handle a trigger. 

There isn’t enough room on a post to go over every possible self-soothing/grounding behavior but I’m going to list some. Do some exploration on your own to find something that works or you.

1. Get an ‘oh shit’ box, or a grounding bag, or whatever you want to call it. A place where you physically keep  things that help you. Kind notes from friends. A color book. Play Dough. You’ll want things that cover all the sensory experiences.

2. Proper breathing exercises. These don’t work for everyone- but they do have a higher success rate when done correctly. 

3. Cold oranges. Oranges kept in the fridge and then peeled help a lot of people ‘come down’ from triggered states. It’s a sensory thing- both touch and focus and smell.

4. Keeping a grounding object. Whether it be a spinner ring, a necklace, a rock you keep in your pocket. Something you touch often and use as a ‘I am here and this is now’

5. Essential oils can really help.

6. Journaling or Art.

7. Going back to a safe place. Whether this be a physical place or a ‘place’ in your mind.

8. Counting down from 100 by 7’s. Or other things like that require you to focus.

9. Having a playlist specifically for these times. I find that having them set from sort of… high energy.angry. music to slowly going down to more calm helps me personally.

10. Progressive Muscle Relaxation.

But really, self soothing/grounding things… there are hundreds upon hundreds of options.  It’s just a matter of looking around and finding what works for you. You’ll want to find multiple. These are not cure alls by themselves- they are skills to layer upon one another.

Step Three: Define Your Triggers

In step one- you identified your triggers, now I want you to better define them. 

For instance- if touch sets you off- is it all touch? or is touch to a certain area of your body? or by people you don’t know? or when you don’ t have forewarning

This will help you understand where to start.

Step Four: Create an Action Plan and act on it.

Now you’re going to use all the information from steps three and two, as well as figuring out what skills and people you have in your life that would be willing to help.

Know what coping skills/self soothing/grounding things you will turn to.

Figure out how you’re going to start. Start small. For instance- if you have a touch trigger then you might want to start by making sure you’re as completely relaxed and in as safe an environment as possible- and then having someone you trust touch you.

Remind yourself that you are safe, that you know who is doing it, and that you’re going to be okay. Once again- start out small. Only do it for a few minutes at first- if that.

If a place is triggering, having a friend come with you and working yourself up to staying longer times. Knowing that this time? You can leave as soon as you need to. You are in control. Notice how you feel- notice the racing heart or the nausea or whatever it is- don’t shame yourself for feeling this way. Just know that it won’t be forever.

You’re going to want to make new associations as well. In over simplified terms- a trigger is basically when we see/feel/hear/whatever A and the synaptic connection immediately jumps to the trauma. What you want to do is make new synaptic connections so that it is no longer the first place you unconsciously jump to- and strengthen them regularly.  

You’re going to want to slowly work yourself up to handling more and more. It is a slow process, and it often involves a lot of agitation. Don’t push yourself too hard too fast. It’s better to spend awhile working on five minutes at a time until five minutes doesn’t bother you- than to jump in and push yourself into a relapse.

Step Five: Self Care and Processing.

Make sure that you self-soothe before and after you do things and to spend time processing what happened and how it makes you feel. When you start to tackle triggers things will usually come up. It will probably help to keep a journal regarding this process. Talk about how it makes you feel, whether physically or emotionally. Talk about what seems to work and what seems to not. You may notice patterns this way too. 

Don’t beat yourself up for not doing perfectly or still getting upset. Instead celebrate the successes and that you are now in control. You can end the trigger sensation when you want to. You can self soothe now. You have the power.

There will a guide regarding ways to handle names specifically sometime in the future. 


Oct 19th at 4PM / via: dajo42 / op: ghostruto / 23,145 notes